IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION for VELTIN Gel

Do not use VELTIN Gel if you have Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, or have had inflammation of the colon (colitis) with past antibiotic use. Talk to your doctor if you are not sure if you have one of these conditions. See full Important Safety Information below

Frequently
Asked Questions

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Q: What causes acne and what are the different types?

A: Acne (pimples, whiteheads, or blackheads) is a common skin condition that comes in various forms. The 4 key factors in acne are excess oil production, clogged pores, the presence of bacteria, and inflammation (redness and swelling). During puberty, your hormones cause the oil glands of the skin to produce extra oil. But not all of it can flow freely to the skin’s surface. The excess oil and buildup of dead skin cells can cause pores to clog. On top of that, bacteria can grow in the excess oil and cause inflammation.

There are 2 types of acne lesions: noninflammatory and inflammatory.

Noninflammatory
  • Blackheads—occur above the skin when open pores fill with excess oil and dead skin cells
  • Whiteheads—occur beneath the skin when pores get clogged by oil and skin cells
Inflammatory (pimples)
  • Papules—small red bumps
  • Pustules—pus-filled, blister-like bumps
  • Nodules—large, painful, solid bumps deep in the skin
Your doctor can find the right treatment for your kind of acne.
Q: Where does acne appear?

A: Acne usually appears on the face. But it may also occur on the upper neck, upper back, chest, and shoulders.
Q: Who gets acne?

A: Acne mostly affects teenagers and young adults. You should know that you're not the only one with acne. About 80% of all teens and young adults will have acne breakouts at some point. However, acne is not limited to any age group. In fact, adults can develop acne even if they never had it as a teen.
Q: How is acne treated?

A: There are many ways to treat acne. It just depends on the type of acne you have. A good start would be to wash your face gently 2 times a day (and after sweating) with water and a mild soap. However, sometimes you may need more help to manage your acne. If that's the case, talk to your parents about visiting a doctor or dermatologist..
Q: What is VELTIN Gel?

A: VELTIN Gel combines 2 medicines, tretinoin and clindamycin phosphate, in one product that may be prescribed by your doctor. More effective than either tretinoin or clindamycin alone, VELTIN Gel helps treat inflammatory acne (red bumps and pus-filled pimples) and noninflammatory acne (whiteheads and blackheads).
Q: How do I apply VELTIN Gel?

A: VELTIN Gel can fit into your nighttime routine with 3 steps:
  • Wash your face gently with mild soap and water
  • Pat the skin dry
  • Squeeze a pea-sized amount of VELTIN Gel onto one fingertip, then gently rub over the entire affected area. Do not get VELTIN Gel in your eyes, mouth, or on your lips.
Q: When will I see results with VELTIN Gel?

A: Every case of acne is different. Treatment may help prevent new breakouts, so keep in mind that it doesn’t work overnight. Use as directed by your doctor.

VELTIN Gel is prescription medicine used on the skin to treat acne in people 12 years and older.

It is not known if VELTIN Gel is safe or effective in children under 12 years of age.

IMPORTANT: VELTIN Gel is for use only on your skin. Do not get VELTIN Gel in your mouth, eyes, or vagina.

Important Safety Information for VELTIN Gel

Do not use VELTIN Gel if you have Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, or have had inflammation of the colon (colitis) with past antibiotic use. Talk to your doctor if you are not sure if you have one of these conditions.

Clindamycin, one of the ingredients in VELTIN Gel, can cause severe colitis that may lead to death. Topical clindamycin may be absorbed through the skin into the bloodstream. Diarrhea, bloody diarrhea, and colitis have been reported with the use of topical clindamycin. Stop using VELTIN Gel and call your doctor if you develop severe watery diarrhea, bloody diarrhea, or severe stomach cramps.

While using VELTIN Gel, limit your time in the sun and avoid tanning beds and sunlamps. VELTIN Gel may cause your skin to become sunburned more easily. If you have a sunburn, do not use VELTIN Gel until it is healed. Use sunscreen and protective clothing, such as a hat. Also avoid other weather extremes such as wind and cold temperatures because these may be irritating to your skin.

Common side effects of VELTIN Gel include skin irritation (for example dryness, peeling, burning, or itching), which usually decreases gradually after 2 weeks.

Tell your doctor if you have any allergies or any other medical conditions.

Before using VELTIN Gel, tell your doctor if you plan to have surgery with general anesthesia. One of the medicines in VELTIN Gel can affect how certain anesthesia medicines work.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant, as it is not known if VELTIN Gel may harm your unborn baby.

It is not known if VELTIN Gel passes into breast milk. Topical clindamycin may be absorbed through the skin into the bloodstream. Clindamycin may pass into the breast milk when taken by mouth or by injection. You and your doctor should decide if you will use VELTIN Gel or breast-feed. You should not do both.

VELTIN Gel should not be used with products that contain erythromycin. Tell your doctor if you take medicine that contains erythromycin.

For more information about VELTIN Gel, please see the full Prescribing Information.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

VELTIN is a registered trademark of Astellas Pharma Europe B.V.